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Archive for May, 2009

Being laid off is, to put it mildly, a big bummer. Nobody like sto get let go. So anyone who has a job is grateful to have a steady paycheck. Especially those workers who watched their friends and colleagues get pink slips in recent months.

So what’s the problem?

Well, when companies lose body count, they don’t necessarily lose an equal amount of work. So you’re left with fewer employees doing a disproportionate amount of work. As a result, you’re seeing a lot of burned out workers.

Forty-seven percent of workers reported they have taken on more responsibility because of a layoff within their organization. Thirty-seven percent said they are handling the work of two people.

So are you surprised that 30 percent feel burned out?

To accommodate growing to-do lists, 34 percent of workers who kept their jobs after a layoff reported they are spending more time at the office. Seventeen percent are putting in at least 10 hours per day. Twenty-two percent are working more weekends.

“Companies today are having to do more with less as they contend with shrinking budgets and staff levels,” said Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Resources at CareerBuilder. “Employees are feeling added pressure as they shoulder heavier workloads and strive to maintain productivity levels. It’s critical that managers and employees work together to prioritize and set realistic expectations, so work demands feel attainable and less overwhelming.”

Haefner recommends the following tips to keep stress levels in check:

1) Don’t over-promise. If two or more projects come up at the same time, work with your supervisor to identify which takes precedence and establish reasonable timelines.

2) Take time to recharge. Go for a walk on your lunch break. Take a personal day. Get eight hours of sleep. Ultimately, recharging your battery will serve you and the company better.

3) Cut the e-leash. Unless needed, turn off electronic devices at a certain time of the day to designate the end of that workday and avoid getting caught up in discussions that can wait until the morning.

4) Explore flexible work arrangements. Cutting your commute one or two days a week can help shorten your workday. More employers today are open to offering telecommuting and other options that may help to provide a better work/life balance.

5) Don’t get caught up in the rumor mill. Forty-two percent of workers reported they are fearful of layoffs within their organization. Ignore speculation and focus on the task at hand.

Although you  might think this is a problem for workers who have been with the company for a while, it’s worth keeping in mind. Especially if you’re the young, new member on the team, you might find a lot of work piling up on your desk. Breathe in. Breathe out. Work hard. Rest.

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hiremytvadCareerBuilder is looking to you to make its next Super Bowl ad … and will give you $100,000 to do it!

That’s right. CareerBuilder is looking to job seekers to create its next TV spot because, after all, who knows job search better than the job seekers themselves?

If you win, CareerBuilder will produce your ad, send you on a trip for a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the commercial and air it during Super Bowl XLIV on February 7, 2010. Oh, and did we mention the $100,000 “paycheck”? Or the $50,000 runner-up prize?

All you have to do is go to http://www.hiremytvad.com/ and submit a 25-second video of your idea. Applications will be judged on: creativity, originality, entertainment value, performance level, humor and alignment with the CareerBuilder brand.

Want to know more? Check out the story in today’s Wall Street Journal and go to http://www.hiremytvad.com/ for full details and to enter.

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hiremytvadCareerBuilder is looking to you to make its next Super Bowl ad … and will give you $100,000 to do it!

That’s right. CareerBuilder is looking to job seekers to create its next TV spot because, after all, who knows job search better than the job seekers themselves?

If you win, CareerBuilder will produce your ad, send you on a trip for a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the commercial and air it during Super Bowl XLIV on February 7, 2010. Oh, and did we mention the $100,000 “paycheck”? Or the $50,000 runner-up prize?

All you have to do is go to http://www.hiremytvad.com/ and submit a 25-second video of your idea. Applications will be judged on: creativity, originality, entertainment value, performance level, humor and alignment with the CareerBuilder brand.

Want to know more? Check out the story in today’s Wall Street Journal and go to http://www.hiremytvad.com/ for full details and to enter.

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Commencement processionToday, we have a guest blog about salaries for the Class of 2009 from our friends at Parade magazine. Parade has been contributing weekly content to CareerBuilder and TheWorkBuzz related to its “What People Earn” issue, which reports on salary trends and the earnings of real Americans.

What People Earn: College Graduates Finding Bright Spots in Dreary Economy

By Brad Dunn, PARADE

The Class of 2009 has been watching the job market disintegrate since senior year began.

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) released another round of discouraging data in early May. Fewer than one in five graduates who are looking for jobs have found one, and employers are planning to hire 22 percent fewer graduates this year than they did last year.

On top of that, the worst job market in 25 years has brought of a sense of déjà vu to households across the country. Many of the estimated 1.6 million students graduating college in May and June have parents who went searching for their first jobs in the equally dismal early-1980s. It’s an economic rerun for the whole family.

“You are graduating into a world of anxiety and uncertainty,” Vice President Joe Biden told graduates of Syracuse University. “But these are the moments you can embrace … only a handful of us ever get a chance to actually shape the course of history.”

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One of the quintessential moments of Americana is a teenager’s first job, normally in the summer. It seems like everyone had that first paycheck for doing something related to summer. Worked at the movies? A burger joint? Mow lawns? Be a lifeguard?

It’s that time of year again, and employers are still hiring for summer jobs like they were last year. The only problem is that there are many more job seekers looking for work this year than in summers past.  Nearly a quarter (23 percent) of employers plan to hire seasonal workers for the summer, in line with last year’s findings, but the competition for those jobs will be stiffer than in years past due to high unemployment and a tough economy. This is according to CareerBuilder’s Annual Summer Job Forecast that was conducted from February 20 to March 11, 2009, among more than 2,500 employers.

Those that land summer jobs may have a chance to parlay their roles into year-round positions. More than half (56 percent) of companies reported that they would consider summer recruits for permanent placement within their organizations.

When it comes to summer paychecks, nearly eight-in-ten (77 percent) hiring managers will offer the same pay to seasonal workers this year as they did last year, while 9 percent will offer more. An additional 9 percent will offer less and 5 percent said they were unsure. Two-in-five companies (42 percent) plan to pay summer workers $10 or more per hour and 6 percent plan to pay $20 or more per hour. Thirty percent anticipate paying between $8 and $10 per hour, while 10 percent expect to pay less than $7 per hour.

“Summer job seekers face a bigger challenge this year than in years past, as the market is flooded with candidates looking for both full and part-time positions,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder. “The good news is that many traditional summer jobs are still available, but in this environment, it is essential that job seekers differentiate themselves and demonstrate how their skills can have a positive impact on a business in a short amount of time.”

Comparing the industries surveyed, hospitality and retail have plans to bring the most summer workers on board, at 38 percent and 34 percent respectively. Across all industries, the most popular summer positions being offered include:

  • Office support – 26 percent
  • Customer service – 18 percent
  • Research – 12 percent
  • Landscape/maintenance – 11 percent
  • Restaurant/food service – 11 percent
  • Sales – 10 percent
  • Construction/painting – 8 percent

When asked about the most unusual or memorable summer jobs they’ve ever held, workers shared the following responses:

  • Bungee-jumping tower assistant
  • Commercial bee herder
  • Scouted garage sales for items to resell on eBay
  • Murder Mystery dinner actor
  • Cleaned gum off of school desks
  • Gun fighter at a theme park
  • Popsicle maker
  • Picked up road kill
  • Painted silo tops hanging from a crane
  • Waterslide repairman

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cbbreeToday we hear from Bree, as she reflect on the key lessons she learned as a CBCampus Ambassador. Here’s what she’s taking away from this experience:

  • Communication is key! Being a communication major, I obviously appreciate this. However, there were a few times I was a little unclear about the task at hand and extra clarification and communication on my part would have helped.
  • Learn on the job….and quickly! Prior to being a marketing representative, I had never written blog posts. It took me a few times to figure out the style and what my company was looking for. This trial and error process is something I know I will use….often.
  • Ask for help! When I was struggling with things like formatting blogs or creating posters, I found the easiest way to get the job done was to ask for help. I can’t be too proud or I’ll never improve.
  • Learn from peers! Fortunately, I was able to contact marketing reps from other schools who had already been through the process. They were a great tool and didn’t make it seem like I was jumping into something blind folded. People before me have been there, done that. They knew what worked, and what didn’t. Using co-workers as a resource is vital to my success.
  • When I get knocked off the horse, I have to get right back on. Rejection is going to be a part of my career…whether I choose entertainment, marketing, public relations, etc. I’m going to get rejected. I experienced this a few times during my marketing endeavors, but I had to get over it really fast; I can’t let rejection phase me. Learn from the experience and move on!

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gradcityWhile there’s relief that classes are over, exams have been taken and term papers turned in, what lies ahead for the Class of 2009 is an extremely challenging and competitive job market.

For new grads who plan to expand their job searches beyond their college or hometowns, Apartments.com and CBcampus.com just released the “Top 10 Best Cities for Recent College Graduates.” The list is based on the ranking of the top U.S. cities with the highest concentration of young adults (age 20 – 24) from the U.S. Census Bureau (2006), inventory of jobs requiring less than one year of experience from CBcampus.com (2009) and the average cost of rent for a one bedroom apartment from Apartments.com (2009).

According to Apartments.com and CBcampus.com, the top 10 cities for new grads are: 

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